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A New Beginning and Fresh Start

The Five Days of Diwali Celebrations

Diwali is the Indian festival that brings a series of festivals with it. One after another, we get a chance to celebrate five ceremonious occasions.

Rituals and preparations for Diwali begin days or weeks in advance. The festival formally begins two days before the night of Diwali, and ends two days thereafter.

Diwali – Day One

Diwali – Day Two

Diwali – Day Three

Diwali – Day Four

Diwali – Day Five

For some people, Diwali marks the start of a new year and a new beginning and a time for personal reassessment of their life: their personal and family accomplishments, their contributions to society and the poor, their strengths and weaknesses and making plans for a new beginning and fresh start.

Before Diwali, people spend a lot of time and energy cleaning and sweeping their homes and their environment and buy new items for their house to make their homes and environment more attractive.

Swami Chidanand Saraswati asks, ‘But, what about our hearts? When was the last time we swept out our hearts? When did we last empty them of all the dirt and garbage that has accumulated throughout our lives? That is the real cleaning we must do. That is the real meaning of “starting fresh.”

All the Best!

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Diwali – Day Three

The Five Days of Diwali Celebrations

Diwali is the Indian festival that brings a series of festivals with it. One after another, we get a chance to celebrate five ceremonious occasions.

Rituals and preparations for Diwali begin days or weeks in advance. The festival formally begins two days before the night of Diwali, and ends two days thereafter.

Diwali –  Day One

Diwali – Day Two

Day Three

The day after Naraka Chaturdashi comes Lakshmi-pooja. It occurs on Amavasya i.e. no moon day which is also called ‘Badi Diwali’.

This is the main day of celebrations of the festival of Diwali. The dark night is illuminated by lamps and at dusk firecrackers are burst. New account books are opened after a pooja. Generally the traders do not make any payments on that day to preserve Lakshmi in home. In every household, cash, jewellery and an idol of the goddess Lakshmi is worshipped. Friends, neighbours and relatives are invited over and celebrations are in full swing.

The most famous legend behind the celebrations of Diwali is about the prince of Ayodhya – Lord Shri Ram. According to the legend, the king of Lanka, Ravan, kidnapped Lord Ram’s wife, Sita from the jungle, where they were staying as per the instructions of King Dashratha, father of Lord Ram. Then Ram attacked Lanka, killed Ravan and released Sita from the custody. He returned to Ayodhya with his wife Sita and younger brother Lakshamana after fourteen years.

Therefore, the people of Ayodhyaa decorated their homes as well as Ayodhyaa, by lighting tiny diyas, in order to welcome their beloved prince Shri Ram and Devi Sita. Ram is considered the symbol of good and the positive things and Ravan represents the evils. Therefore, Diwali is considered the festival, which establishes the victory of good over the evil. On the night of Diwali, people light diyas, which is again an icon of positive energy to conquer darkness, the symbol of negative energy.

On this day, people wear new clothes and share gifts and sweets with their friends and relatives. Women prepare delicacies and whole house is illuminated with ‘diyas’ and candles. Fireworks and crackers are the kids’ favourites on this day.

Diwali Day Four Story follows….

Posted in: Diwali, Festival, Festivals, India

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Diwali – Day Two

The Five Days of Diwali Celebrations

Diwali is the Indian festival that brings a series of festivals with it. One after another, we get a chance to celebrate five ceremonious occasions.

Rituals and preparations for Diwali begin days or weeks in advance. The festival formally begins two days before the night of Diwali, and ends two days thereafter.

Diwali – Day One

Day Two          

The second day of Diwali is called ‘Narak Chaturdashi’, which is popularly known as ‘Chhoti Diwali’.

One famous story behind the celebrations of Diwali is about the demon king Narakasur, who was ruler of Pragjyotishpur, a province to the South of Nepal. During a war, he defeated Lord Indra and snatched away the magnificent earrings of Mother Goddess Aditi, who was not only the ruler of Suraloka, but also a relative of Lord Krishna’s wife – Satyabhama. Narakasur also imprisoned sixteen thousand daughters of Gods and saints in his harem. A day before Diwali, Lord Krishna killed Narakasur, released the jailed daughters and restored the precious earrings of Mother Goddess Aditi.

On second day, people take bath before sunrise, anoint themselves with oil and ‘Ubtan’, a scrub made up of gram flour and fragrant powders. A general custom followed during the second day of Diwali is to burst crackers. People illuminate their homes with diya, as to welcome the set the mood for celebrations in the following day.

Day Three Story follows…..

Posted in: Diwali, Festival, Festivals, India

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