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Icing on the Cake

Icing-on-the-cakeThere are things you can see and things you can’t. Same with Branding.

Visible Branding and Invisible Branding.

Visible branding is about Logos, Packaging, Collateral, Store Design, Website, Social Media presence.

Visible branding is important to create the attraction towards the brand.

It is the promise.

Invisible branding is Reliability. Confidence. Dependability. Quality.

It is about delivery.

Brands have been taking a cakewalk through visible branding. The appeal of the icing has made them forget the cake.

Brands need to look not just at the icing but what goes into the cake. Or it leaves a bad taste in the mouth.

Have the cake and eat it too.

See how Visible and Invisible Branding do wonders for your brand http://parichay-india.in/visible&invisible.pdf

Write to us for your enquiry at response@parichay-india.in

Posted in: Brand News, Branding, Entrepreneur, Excellence, Focus on Solutions, IMPACT Presentation Skills, India, Motivational, Personal Development, Team Work, Visible and Invisible Branding, Work Culture

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Diwali – Day One

Diwali, the Indian festival of lights is one of the most festive, popular and beautiful times of the year. Also called Deepavali, it literally means a “Row of Lights.” It is a time filled with light and love; a time when Indians all over the world rejoice.

It’s celebration include millions of lights shining on housetops, outside doors and windows, around temples and other buildings in the communities and countries where it is observed.

Diwali falls towards the end of October, or first half of November each year, on the day of ‘Amavasyaa’, when the moon does not rise and there is darkness all around. The darkest night of autumn lit with diyas, candles and lanterns, makes the festival of lights particularly memorable.

Diwali is a festival of celebrations such as lightings, crackers, cleanliness, colourful rangoli making, social gatherings to exchange greetings and sharing sweets with your loved ones. The people of all age groups and classes with equal zeal and enthusiasm celebrate Diwali throughout India. They put on new apparels and participate in the various activities that are related to Diwali celebrations.

The Five Days of Diwali Celebrations

Diwali is the Indian festival that brings a series of festivals with it. One after another, we get a chance to celebrate five ceremonious occasions.

Rituals and preparations for Diwali begin days or weeks in advance. The festival formally begins two days before the night of Diwali, and ends two days thereafter.

Day One

The first day of this festival begins with ‘Dhan Trayodashi’ or ‘Dhanteras’.

The word Dhanteras is constituent of the terms ‘dhan’ which means wealth and ‘teras’ which means thirteenth, hence it is a festival observed on the thirteenth lunar day of Krishna Paksha of the Hindu Calendar.

There are two popular legends associated with Dhanteras.

According to the legends, during the churning of ocean by the Gods and the demons, Dhanvantari – the physician of the Gods came out of the ocean on the day of Dhanteras, with a pot of amrita that was meant for the welfare of the humankind. This day also marks the arrival of Goddess Lakshmi, which is celebrated by drawing small footprints of the deity, with rice flour and vermilion powder.

Another legend says once there was a 16-year-old prince known as Hima. His horoscope predicted that he would die of snake bite on the fourth day of his marriage. On that particular day, the prince’s newly married wife, decided to play a trick. She laid down all her jewellery, coins in heaps near the door of the sleeping chamber and lit lamps all over the palace. Then she started narrating stories to her husband to prevent him from falling asleep. Then Yama came in the guise of a serpent. His eyes were blinded by the shine of the coins and jewellery. So, Yama could not enter the chamber of the prince. So, He climbed the heap of the jewellery and sat there the entire night, listening to the stories and songs. In the morning, Yama went away. Thus the prince was saved from the clutches of death. Hence, the day came to be celebrated as Dhanteras.

Dhanteras is an extremely significant day for all. People renovate, decorate their houses and workplaces on this day and make traditional ‘Rangoli’ motifs on the entrance, to welcome Goddess Lakshmi. Lamps and candles are lit throughout the night. It is considered auspicious to buy gold and silver on this day. Many people opt for buying new utensils on this day.

New account books are bought on this day and placed before Goddess Lakshmi to get Her blessings. People start new business on Dhanteras because it is believed that business started on this day will be very profitable.

Diwali Day Two Story follows….

Posted in: Diwali, Festival, Festivals, India

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Talent

The Surprising Talents of the Middle-Aged Mind
Barbara Strauch

“Can I still compete?”

It’s a question many of us increasingly ask as we reach middle age.

We watch younger colleagues master new computer systems with ease or pull all-nighters with nary a hair out of place and — quite naturally — we’re concerned.

Luckily, recent research in brain science suggests that perhaps we should fret less.

Over the past few years, neuroscientists have begun to zero in on the brain’s changes in middle age, and what they’ve found is encouraging. Results of long-term studies show that — contrary to stereotypes — we actually grow smarter in key areas in middle age which, with longer life spans, now stretches from our mid 40s to our mid to late 60s.

In areas as diverse as vocabulary and inductive reasoning, our brains function better than they did in our 20s. As we age, we more easily get the “gist” of arguments. Even our judgment of others improves. Often, we simply “know” if someone — or some idea — is to be trusted. We also get better at knowing what to ignore and when to hold our tongues.

Not long ago, a mid-level executive told me how he’d recently changed the way he deals with younger colleagues. When gathered to discuss a problem, he keeps his “mouth shut” and listens. Even though — more often than not — he has a good solution, he waits. He does not speak.

“I find it works best if I let the younger workers talk first, wrestle with the problem in their own way,” he told me. “Then after a while, I say what I think might work. I’m not sure why, but this seems to work best and to help us all learn and solve the problem better.”

In fact, though he did not realize it, the executive was using the best parts of his calmer and more experienced middle-aged brain to help him manage his situation — and get better results.

It’s true that by midlife our brains can show some fraying. Brain processing speed slows down. Faced with new information, we often cannot master it as quickly as our younger peers. And there’s little question that our short-term memories suffer. It’s easy to panic when you find you can’t remember the name of that person you know in the elevator, or even the movie you saw last week.

But it turns out that such skills don’t really matter that much. By midlife our brains have developed a whole host of talents that are, in the end, just as well suited to navigating the modern, complex workplace. As we age, we get better at seeing the possible. Younger brains, predictably, are set up to focus on the negative and potential trouble. Older brains, studies show, often reach solutions faster, in part, because they focus on what can be done.

By the time we reach middle age, millions of patterns have been established in our brains, and these connected pathways provide invaluable perspective — even when it’s subconscious. For instance, some middle-aged managers I’ve spoken with talked about how solutions seem to “pop” into their heads “like magic.”

It doesn’t come from magic, of course, but from the very real — and often unappreciated — talents of our middle-aged brains.

Posted in: Motivational, Work Culture

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